top of page
  • Writer's pictureDan Wagner

Hidden in Plain Sight: The Stone Carvings at Worden's Ledges

In northeast Ohio's Hinckley Reservation, the Worden's Ledges Loop Trail meanders beneath a dense canopy of oaks and elms, revealing a tapestry of history etched into moss-covered sandstone ledges. The formations, carved by nature's hands over millions of years, showcase the craftsmanship of a humble bricklayer who infused the area with his own personal flair long before the footpath was sculpted.


The story begins with Hiram Mace Worden, a skilled tombstone and statue artisan, who migrated from New York to Hinckley, Ohio in the early 1840s. In 1851, he married Melissa Bissell, and together they welcomed four children to the world, with their youngest daughter, Nettie, completing the family circle. Hiram flourished as the driving force behind the prosperous Medina Monumental Company, ensuring the well-being of his family of six. In 1860, the Worden family erected their cherished home atop the picturesque ledges. Following Hiram's passing in 1896, Nettie assumed sole ownership of the Worden homestead, an enduring legacy that spanned four generations.


In 1945, Nettie married Noble Stuart, a bricklayer from Cleveland who harbored dreams of becoming a sculptor. Tragically, Nettie passed away a mere year after their marriage, bequeathing the homestead to Noble. In the years following Nettie's death, Noble sought solace in the forest and ledges beneath the property, where he chiseled representations of things that held significance to him. His artistic endeavors included reliefs depicting historical figures, a three-masted schooner, a grand sphinx, a cross and Bible, and even the countenance of the legendary baseball player Ty Cobb. Noble Stuart breathed his last in 1976, yet his creations persist today, subtly hidden in plain sight within the southern reaches of Ohio's Hinckley Reservation.


Worden's Ledges

Trailhead elevation 1,193'

Water None

Don't miss the carving of George Washington/Thomas Jefferson


Hiking Worden's Ledges

The Worden's Ledges Trailhead can be found along Ledges Rd near coordinates 41.202456, -81.718196. A primary parking area with capacity for a dozen vehicles can be found here, while an overflow lot lies adjacent to it. Setting off from the primary parking area, the clearly marked path winds northward into the forest. Trail markers adorned with raccoon faces help guide your way along the route.


Worden's Ledges

At 0.1 miles, the trail arrives at a well-marked junction. Veering left and hiking the trail in a clockwise direction will help you locate the carvings, which lie ahead. The first carving that captures your attention is Stuart's grand sphinx. Carved out of a single boulder, this creation stretches more than eight feet in length and stands at a height of nearly four feet.


Worden's Ledges

Over time, the face of the sphinx has experienced a certain degree of natural erosion. Nevertheless, it maintains its overall excellent condition, despite the effects of nature's gentle touch.


Worden's Ledges

Just beyond the sphinx, you'll soon come across a large formation bearing the unmistakable inscription "HM Worden 1851" carved into the stone. It's believed that the significant date marks the year of Hiram and Melissa's marriage. Adjacent to this inscription, along the left edge of the formation, you will find a captivating carving of an unknown individual. Speculation suggests that the depiction may portray either Romulus or Remus, the legendary twin brothers of Roman mythology who were raised by a she-wolf and went on to establish the city of Rome. However, the true meaning and representation of this carving remain veiled in mystery.


Worden's Ledges

Regardless of the intended subject of the carving, there is no denying the exceptional level of detail it possesses. From the intricately rendered eye and ear to the meticulously sculpted hair and beard, every aspect of this carving is a testament to the remarkable craftsmanship involved.


Worden's Ledges

A short distance beyond this, you will come across a touching tribute in the form of the name "Nettie" gracefully inscribed into a ledge near ground level. This heartfelt gesture serves as an enduring homage to Stuart's beloved wife, forever etching her name into the very fabric of the landscape.


Worden's Ledges

Directly across from the "Nettie" inscription, your eyes will be drawn to a modest carving positioned above eye level. This intricately crafted artwork showcases a three-masted schooner, capturing the essence of maritime adventure that must have interested Stuart. If you delve deeper into the immediate surroundings you'll also discover a number of nautical symbols etched into the sandstone boulders.


Worden's Ledges

Positioned to the left of the ship carving, you'll find a cross accompanied by an open Bible meticulously carved into the ledge. The remarkable level of detail lavished upon the Bible showcases the devotion and skill of Stuart's artistry. Standing tall, the cross exceeds a height of four feet, emphasizing its significance and sense of reverence.


Worden's Ledges

Continuing along the trail, you will eventually come across a somewhat inconspicuous carving on the left side, positioned at roughly chest level. Some speculate that this depiction could potentially represent either George Washington or Thomas Jefferson. Due to its relatively discrete placement, this particular carving can be easily overlooked if you're not scouring the area for it.


Worden's Ledges

Just a short distance beyond the carving that could potentially represent either Washington or Jefferson, you'll be greeted with an imposing representation of the legendary baseball icon, Ty Cobb. This larger-than-life depiction of Cobb can be found on the right side of the trail, positioned above eye level.


Worden's Ledges

The portrayal of Cobb measures approximately four feet in height and two feet in width. Displayed alongside the depiction, you will find an inscription bearing the name "Cobb."


Worden's Ledges

Throughout the area, you will encounter numerous inscriptions etched into stones, varying in size and significance. One noteworthy inscription reads "Gate Stone Post 1852" carved into a quarried stone. Located beyond the Cobb carving, this particular stone can be found on the right side of the trail. Its presence serves as a historical marker, providing a glimpse into the past and reminding visitors of the heritage of the ledges area.


Worden's Ledges

To conclude the loop, simply follow the trail until it reconnects with the junction near the trail's starting point, ultimately leading you back to the trailhead. Although the official length of the hike is 0.8 miles, your distance covered may be closer to a mile or even more, depending on the amount of exploring you do near the ledges.

Commenti


bottom of page